Apr 11

Here are the results from the New South Wales tree climbing championships 2013. BELAYED SPEED CLIMB

BELAYED SPEED CLIMB TIME Belayed
Male Contestant TIMER min sec 1/100 Time (sec) AVG Time FASTEST TIME SCORE Ranking
1 Barton Allen-Hall A 31 1 31.01 31.01 26.58 17.79 4
B 31 31
C 0
2 Jamie Boston A 41 12 41.12 41.56 26.58 12.51 7
B 42 42
C 0
3 Jamie Montogery A 26 65 26.65 26.58 26.58 20.00 1
B 26 50 26.5
C 0
4 James Stapleton A 28 87 28.87 28.79 26.58 18.90 2
B 28 70 28.7
C 0
5 Tiago Miranda A 30 69 30.69 30.80 26.58 17.89 3
B 30 90 30.9
C 0
6 Paul Hasemann A 33 18 33.18 33.18 26.58 16.70 5
B 33 18 33.18
C 0
7 Scott Pollock A 33 73 33.73 34.02 26.58 16.28 6
B 34 30 34.3
C 0
8 Josh Micallef A 43 37 43.37 43.44 26.58 11.57 8
B 43 50 43.5
C 0
9 Wayne Plumb A 49 16 49.16 49.17 26.58 8.70 9
B 49 18 49.18
C 0
10 Matt Coyne A 1 2 18 62.18 62.39 26.58 2.09 10
B 1 2 60 62.6
C 0
11 Simone Malone A 1 3 95 63.95 63.83 26.58 1.38 11
B 1 3 70 63.7
C 0
12 Kane Warren A 1 31 21 91.21 91.76 26.58 0.00 12
B 1 32 30 92.3
C 0
13 Wayne Grey A 1 9 50 69.5 69.10 26.58 0.00 12
B 1 8 70 68.7
C 0
14 Christine Rampling A 1 22 55 82.55 82.68 26.58 0.00 12
B 1 22 80 82.8
C 0
15 Aaron Roston A 1 12 5 72.05 72.05 26.58 0.00 12
B 1 12 4 72.04
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Apr 11

Here are the results from the New South Wales tree climbing championships 2013. WORK CLIMB

WORK CLIMB Handsaw Limb Toss Pole Pruner Limb Walk Landing Unsafe Acts TOTAL AVERAGE Enter Middle Average TIME AVG FASTEST Total Points GRAND TOTAL WC
Male Contestant JUDGE (-9 –> 8) (-9 –>11) (-15 –> 8) (-9    –> 11) (-6    –> 12) (0 or 3 or DQ) 50 max 50 max 3 Scores Middle Score min sec 1/100 Time (sec) Time TIME(sec) for Time  (80 max) Ranking Comments
1 Barton Allen-Hall 1 6 7 6 9 8 36 32.50 0 0.00 2 52 172 172 172.00 30.00 62.50 1
2 5 6 5 10 3 29 0 2 52 172
3 0 0
4 0 SEE USER’S
5 0 GUIDE
2 Jamie Boston 1 6 5 5 7 10 33 32.50 0 0.00 4 11 251 251 172.00 22.10 54.60 4
2 5 4 5 8 10 32 0 4 11 251
3 0 0
4 0 SEE USER’S
5 0 GUIDE
3 Jamie Montogery 1 6 3 7 9 7 32 30.00 0 0.00 3 18 198 197.5 172.00 27.45 57.45 3
2 7 4 5 5 7 28 0 3 17 197
3 0 0
4 0 SEE USER’S
5 0 GUIDE
4 James Stapleton 1 7 5 9 21 20.00 0 0.00 999 59940 59940 172.00 0.00 20.00 10
2 6 5 8 19 0 999 59940
3 0 0
4 0 SEE USER’S
5 0 GUIDE
5 Tiago Miranda 1 5 4 4 9 8 30 32.00 0 0.00 3 35 215 214 172.00 25.80 57.80 2
2 6 6 6 8 8 34 0 3 33 213
3 0 0
4 0 SEE USER’S
5 0 GUIDE
6 Paul Hasemann 1 5 2 5 2 2 16 21.00 0 0.00 4 56 296 296.5 172.00 17.55 38.55 6
2 6 6 5 1 8 26 0 4 57 297
3 0 0
4 0 SEE USER’S
5 0 GUIDE
7 Scott Pollock 1 4 5 5 8 22 24.50 0 0.00 999 59940 59940 172.00 0.00 24.50 8
2 6 6 5 10 27 0 999 59940
3 0 0
4 0 SEE USER’S
5 0 GUIDE
8 Josh Micallef 1 5 4 5 14 15.00 0 0.00 999 59940 59940 172.00 0.00 15.00 14
2 5 5 6 16 0 999 59940
3 0 0
4 0 SEE USER’S
5 0 GUIDE
9 Wayne Plumb 1 5 9 5 8 27 25.00 0 0.00 999 59940 59940 172.00 0.00 25.00 7
2 6 9 5 3 23 0 999 59940
3 0 0
4 0 SEE USER’S
5 0 GUIDE
10 Matt Coyne 1 6 5 8 3 22 22.00 0 0.00 4 38 278 279 172.00 19.30 41.30 5
2 6 5 8 3 22 0 4 40 280
3 0 0
4 0 SEE USER’S
5 0 GUIDE
11 Simone Malone 1 4 6 5 2 -2 15 16.00 0 0.00 999 0 0 59940 59940 172.00 0.00 16.00 13
2 5 6 2 1 3 17 0 999 0 0 59940
3 0 0
4 0 SEE USER’S
5 0 GUIDE
12 Kane Warren 1 5 6 5 16 16.50 0 0.00 999 59940 59940 172.00 0.00 16.50 12
2 6 6 5 17 0 999 59940
3 0 0
4 0 SEE USER’S
5 0 GUIDE
13 Wayne Grey 1 5 5 9 19 19.50 0 0.00 999 59940 59940 172.00 0.00 19.50 11
2 6 5 9 20 0 999 59940
3 0 0
4 0 SEE USER’S
5 0 GUIDE
14 Christine Rampling 1 5 5 5 8 23 24.00 0 0.00 999 59940 59940 172.00 0.00 24.00 9
2 5 6 5 9 25 0 999 59940
3 0 0
4 0 SEE USER’S
5 0 GUIDE
15 Aaron Roston 1 2 5 8 15 15.00 0 0.00 999 0 0 59940 59940 172.00 0.00 15.00 14
2 2 5 8 15 0 999 0 0 59940
3 0 0
4 0 SEE USER’S
5 0 GUIDE

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Mar 23

Wound evaluation on damaged trees.

Wound evaluation on damaged trees.

                         

A tree is considered to be wounded when its bark is broken so that either its inner bark or wood is exposed to the air. Tree wounds are caused by various agents, including birds, animals, insects, fire, mechanical equipment, lightning, or people and their activities. Tree wounds are classified into three types, depending on their locations: branch wounds, trunk wounds, and root wounds. By allowing Evergreen Tree Care to inspect and find a treatment for the wound it prevents future problems that could occur if the wound does not get treated. This improves the overall health of the tree and allows the tree to use its optimal defences in the best possible way.

TREAT WOUNDS PROPERLY.

Remove injured bark and wood.

Do not enlarge the wound.  Do not point vertical tips.  Do not paint wounds.  WOUND DRESSINGS DO NOT STOP ROT OR DECAY!

DO NOT Break boundaries if cavities are to be cleaned.

DO NOT Drill holes to drain water or other fluids.  Drilling would break boundaries and the presence of the water or other fluids too often stalls decay.

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Mar 23

Eight good reasons Why not to lop or top trees

Eight good reasons Why not to lop or top trees

 

1. STARVATION: Good pruning practices rarely remove more than 20% of the of the crown, which in turn does not seriously interfere with the ability of a tree’s leafy crown to manufacture food. Lopping removes so much of the crown that it upsets an older tree’s well-developed crown-to-root ratio and temporarily cuts off its food-making ability.

 

2. SHOCK: A tree’s crown is like an umbrella that shields much of the tree from the direct rays of the sun. By suddenly removing this protection, the remaining bark tissue is so exposed that scalding may result. There may also be a dramatic effect on neighbouring trees and shrubs. If these thrive in shade and the shade is removed, poor health or death may result.

 

3. INSECTS AND DISEASE: The large stubs of a lopped tree have a difficult time forming callus. The terminal location of these cuts, as well as their large diameter, prevent the tree’s chemically based natural defense system from doing its job. The stubs are highly vulnerable to insect invasion and the spores of decay fungi. If decay is already present in the limb, opening the limb will speed the spread of the disease.

 4. WEAK LIMBS: At best, the wood of a new limb that sprouts after a larger limb is truncated is more weakly attached than a limb that develops more normally. If rot exists or develops at the severed end of the limb, the weight of the sprout makes a bad situation even worse.

 

 5. RAPID NEW GROWTH: The goal of lopping is usually to control the height spread of a tree. Actually, it has just the opposite effect. The resulting sprouts (often called water sprouts) are far more numerous than normal new growth and they elongate so rapidly that the tree returns to its original height in a very short time – and with a far denser crown.

 6. TREE DEATH: Some older trees are more tolerant to lopping than others. Gums, for example, do not sprout readily after severe pruning and the reduced foliage most surely will lead to the death of the tree.

 

7. UGLINESS: A lopped tree is a disfigured tree. Even with its regrowth it never regains the grace and character of its species. The landscape and the community are robbed of a valuable asset.

 

8. COST: To a worker with a saw, lopping a tree is much easier than applying the skill and judgment of good pruning. Therefore, lopping may cost less in the short run. However, the true costs of lopping are hidden. These include: reduced property value, the expense of removal and replacement if the tree dies, the loss of other trees and shrubs if they succumb to changed light conditions, the risk of liability from weakened branches, and increased future maintenance and law suits.

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Mar 23

Stop before you lop or top your tree. Use an arborist not a tree lopper

Stop before you lop or top your tree. Use an arborist not a tree lopper

 

 Picture this: You visit your manicurist because your nails are too long. She agrees you have a problem and recommends you have your whole arm be removed. Better yet, have both of your arms removed, just in case. While, technically, this solves the problem, it demands too high a price. Apparently, this “professional” isn’t sufficiently knowledgeable to offer less severe, more appropriate solutions.

Professional arborist use all the right safety equipment and when pruning trees don’t use spikes on their boots.  

Similar types of “solutions” are sometimes misapplied to tree care problems. The practice known as “topping or lopping” “the lopping off of large parts of a tree” is the tree care equivalent to amputation. Trees are often topped to height or shape, leaving branch stubs and little or no foliage.

Lion-tailing” is another practice that severely damages trees. In this case, the inner foliage, branches, and limbs of a tree are stripped bare. The lion-tailed tree has the unnatural form of a giant umbrella, with the remaining foliage limited to the ends of the branches! The limbs left on the tree are long and bare except for a characteristic “tuft” of foliage at the end, giving the appearance of a lion’s tail.

Consumers today are more knowledgeable and increasingly refuse to allow their trees to be topped or lopped. Unfortunately, some so-called professionals practice lion-tailing, which is not as instantly recognized as a bad practice by consumers.

 

Topping and lopping should not be confused with proper crown reduction pruning, which will safely reduce a tree’s size and redirect its growth. Nor should lion-tailing be confused with proper thinning, which is the selective removal of branches to decrease weight and wind resistance. Generally, proper pruning of either type will not remove more than 25 precent of the tree’s foliage.

Pruning Mature Trees

Pruning is the most common tree maintenance procedure performed by professional arborist. Although forest trees grow quite well with only nature’s pruning, landscape trees require a higher level of care to maintain their safety and aesthetics. Pruning service should be done with an understanding of how the tree responds to each cut. Improper pruning by tree loppers can cause damage that will last for the life of the tree, or worse, shorten the tree’s life. Australia has a standard that is a guide for pruning. AS 4373 2007 is now our current bench mark for good pruning practice.

 

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